Fearful Symmetry

Film. Books. Comics. TV. Music.

Posts Tagged ‘War

Warfare 1944

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Warfare 1944 is a Second World War version of the great Warfare 1917– bit less ‘realistic’ but with more variety of units. it’s a bit of a cake-walk at the easier difficulty but is quite a challenge at the top level.

Written by Fearful Symmetry

July 13, 2009 at 10:55 am

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Poetic Licence – Iain M. Banks’ Consider Phlebas and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land

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I’ve now moved this to my new blog

Written by Fearful Symmetry

June 30, 2009 at 11:59 am

American Soldiers – A Day In Iraq

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It’s a long time since a saw a film so bad it actually annoyed me; a film that makes you despair that it was ever made. American Soldiers – A Day In Iraq is that film. I’d rented it in a moment of madness thinking it was a documentary. How wrong I was.

Let me give you some idea on how bad it is. It was not filmed in Iraq. In fact it was not filmed anywhere in the Middle East. It was filmed in Canada… and it shows, making Ultimate Force’s turning the New Forest into South Africa (or Russia or whatever) look realistic.

It just fails to work on any level. A bunch of American soldiers – that due to poor direction, acting and dialogue you can hardly tell from each other – wander from one repetitive fight scene to another. The enemy all dress alike, faces covered in scarves (probably so they can reuse the same extras) and are armed with magic PRGs that only do damage (even after a direct hit) if the ‘plot’ needs it. The only decent bits are ripped of from other, better movies, especially Black Hawk Down.
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Written by Fearful Symmetry

June 27, 2009 at 3:31 pm

The Religion by Tim Willocks

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The Religion by Tim Willocks

The Religion by Tim Willocks

Tim Willocks has been one of my favourite writers from when I first read Green River Rising in one sitting back when it came out in paperback. Unfortunately he’s been a bit quiet of late spending the last few years contributing to some rather duff films in Hollywood. Green River Rising depicted a brutal prison riot in America and his other novels were deep-fried southern gothic novels of crime and redemption. But now he’s back with something a bit different, a historical novel – but one that still deals with the same essential concerns of his previous novels.

The Religion is set in late medieval Europe, the events occurring mostly during one of the greatest battles in history – the siege of Malta. The title has multiple meanings; The Order of St John who hold the island consider themselves so devout they call themselves The Religion but there is also the Muslim religion of the invaders. Although we have a clash of civilisations at the heart of the novel Willocks shows that to the common man it does not really matter who is charge; everyone involved suffer for their leaders ambitions. In fact the personal obsessions of the main characters are so deep-seated that they are almost religions on there own.

The novel’s flawed hero straddles both of the religions. Mattias Tannhauser was born a Christian in the Germanic area of Europe but in the prologue was captured by Muslim invaders as a child and raised as a warrior for Islam. At the beginning of the novel he’s left behind both factions and is more interested in business ventures. But the Knights of Saint John enlist him to help with the siege by persuading a beautiful woman to beg hin to help him find her son who is lost somewhere in Malta. Close on his heels is a Grand Inquisitor after his blood.
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Written by Fearful Symmetry

June 24, 2009 at 3:38 pm